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Bella Hadid Isn’t Afraid to Speak About Palestine Anymore

In the past few years, Bella Hadid has become increasingly vocal about her support for Palestine, the country where her father, Mohamed Hadid, was born. Her advocacy has gotten her a full-page attack ad in the New York Times and a direct tweet from the official country of Israel Twitter account, both of which she touched on in a new interview about her advocacy.

“I have this overwhelming anxiety of not saying the right thing and not being what everybody needs me to be at all times,” Hadid said at the top of her new interview with Noor Tagouri’s the Rep podcast. “But I’ve also realized that I have done my education enough, I know my family enough, I know my own history enough. And that should be enough.” The supermodel has long been an advocate for Palestine. In a June Instagram post, she reaffirmed her commitment to fight for Palestine, writing, “I will never allow anyone to forget about our beautiful Palestine, or our beautiful people.”

Hadid’s activism has ramped up in the past two years. On Instagram, she’s shared a letter against apartheid, as well as photos and videos of alleged unprovoked violence between the Israel Defense Forces and Palestinians. In March, she and her sister, Gigi Hadid, announced that they would be donating their Fashion Week earnings to organizations providing aid in Ukraine and Palestine.

Her activism has not come without cost. “I had so many companies that stopped working with me,” the supermodel told Rep. “I have friends that completely dropped me.” In May of 2021, she was accused of being an “advocate for throwing Jews into the sea” by the official Israel Twitter account after attending a pro-Palestinian march following an air strike in Gaza. At the time, Hadid called out “Israeli colonization” and “military occupation and apartheid” on Instagram — though she also made clear that this was “not about religion” or “spewing hate on one or the other” — writing, “I stand with my Palestinian brothers and sisters.” Shortly thereafter, Hadid, her sister, and Dua Lipa (who was dating their brother, Anwar Hadid, at the time) were targeted by a full-page ad in the New York Times accusing them of “antisemitism.” Speaking with Rep, Hadid called the ad “disappointing,” adding that the paper “sold their soul.” Reflecting on the vitriol that came her way, the model noted, “When I speak about Palestine, I get labeled as something that I’m not. But I can speak about the same thing that’s happening there, happening somewhere else in the world, and that’s honorable. So, what’s the difference?”

Hadid noted in the interview that she realized at a young age that people wouldn’t necessarily embrace her identity as a proud Palestinian woman. She recalled being called a “terrorist” in the eighth grade. “I was being called names and being immediately blasted as a person of hatred for another people, but all I was talking about was freeing my father’s people — people who are deeply hurting.” But a recent interaction with an Israeli woman in the streets of New York City has made her realize she’s not afraid to speak up anymore.

“I was just leaving lunch, and this woman came up to me and was like, ‘I just moved to New York from Israel recently, and I told myself that if I ever saw Bella Hadid I would walk up to her and ask why she hates me so much,’” Hadid said, adding that she responded openly, saying that she actually welcomed the conversation, telling the woman that she didn’t hate her and inviting her to speak her mind. “I’m not scared of anything, but I was nervous that I wouldn’t be able to combat whatever she had to say to me,” Hadid said. “But I realized in that conversation, it never had to be combative. All it had to be was two girls talking about their history and hopefully finding a common denominator, which is that we want nobody to die.”

Source: thecut.com

Categories Article Gallery Photoshoots

How Bella Hadid and Ramy Youssef Became BFFs

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It is difficult to imagine a career trajectory for a millennial supermodel that does not involve a pivot to acting. In the case of Bella Hadid, arguably the world’s most famous model since she was 17, the crossover might have even seemed inevitable. “People probably thought,” she tells me, “that my first acting job would be something super sensual and sexy.”

Instead, when the 25-year-old makes her acting debut this fall as a guest star on Ramy, it’ll be in a slightly more unhinged role: a weirdo girlfriend.

The Emmy-nominated dark comedy (you can find it on Hulu) follows a fictionalized version of Ramy Youssef, an Egyptian American millennial who tries—and mostly fails—to be a good Muslim as he navigates adulthood. Across two buzzy seasons, the show has been lauded by critics for its general abhorrence of easy morality and its eagerness to dive into messy territory. For example, one of Ramy’s more quotidian plot points involves Ramy helping his best friend jerk off because his muscular dystrophy won’t allow him to masturbate.

And Hadid’s role on the show? “It’s probably one of the weirdest scripts we’ve ever written,” says Youssef. “And that says a lot.”

The model and the showrunner first connected back in January, when Youssef emailed Hadid out of the blue and asked if she’d be interested in a guest spot. They hopped on a Zoom and, after a long conversation, Hadid said yes. “I was like, this is perfect,” Hadid gushes. “We hadn’t even met before, but I had a feeling it was gonna be kismet.”

Hadid, who is of Palestinian descent, already shares with Youssef an overlapping network of friends and creative confidants. Youssef is close with Hadid’s brother, Anwar, and they’re both friends with the Canadian musician Mustafa, who was excited to hear that Hadid had found her way onto the show. “Bella’s been at the center of a world that doesn’t acknowledge what it’s like to be a Muslim at any of the intersections,” Mustafa tells me. “She’s sometimes the only Muslim or Arab person in a room, so it’s great to see Bella surrounded by her community.”

Hadid felt that sense of belonging instantly, she says. When she arrived on set for her first day of filming, she was surprised by the gift the crew had left in her trailer: a T-shirt that said “Free Palestine.” The simple, welcoming gesture made her weep. “I couldn’t handle my emotions,” Hadid says. “Growing up and being Arab, it was the first time that I’d ever been with like-minded people. I was able to see myself.”

I know what Hadid means. Feeling the constant need to minimize your identity can take its toll on you. Growing up Muslim, I often felt like I had to shrink down or hide that part of myself in order to seem less difficult or demanding. Both Hadid and Youssef—each in their own way—seem to be taking a different approach. By amplifying their heritage and proudly asserting their cultural identities, they’re embracing the spotlight and using it to complicate outdated expectations of what Arabs and Muslims are capable of in the culture. Part of what makes Ramy so special is its deft ability to raise heavy and spiritual questions: Underneath all the plotlines about porn stars and racist family members and what really caused 9/11, the show refreshingly offers no tidy answers, nor does it claim to represent what a “good” Muslim even is.

Meanwhile, in the last few years, Hadid has become perhaps the most outspoken American celebrity advocating on behalf of the Palestinian people. In an era of halfhearted virtue signaling, she is finding ways to dig deeper into the issues—and her own experiences—with her platform. This past winter, I was struck by an Instagram post in which Hadid highlighted the discrimination women who wear a hijab, like me, face every day. She took specific aim at a corner of the culture she knows well. “If we are seeing more and more appreciation of hijabs and covers in fashion,” she wrote, “we have to also acknowledge the cycle of abuse that Muslim women of all different ethnicities in fashion get met with on a regular basis within fashion houses, especially in Europe [and] America.” It was, to say the least, not the sort of concern that your traditional supermodel is posting.

If the Hadid we see in the culture is an honest reflection of who she is in private, Youssef couldn’t be more unlike the character he plays on television. Real Ramy is easygoing, kind. Almost effortlessly thoughtful. On the day the pair met up for the photo shoot to accompany this story, he met Hadid at her apartment here in New York and they rode together to set, where he gamely permitted her to take the lead in styling him for the photos. He made certain that he properly introduced me to his then fiancée, and now wife, who came to hang out. He was even so focused on continuing our conversation that he missed his scheduled flight out of town.

The Ramy you see onscreen is a hall-of-fame fuckboy. Like, you could retire his jersey and put it in the fuckboy rafters. TV Ramy is also on a spiritual journey, but his pursuit of inner peace comes at the expense of all the people who love him. The second season of the show concludes with Ramy cheating on his fiancée the night before they get married—with his cousin—a catastrophe that ruins the lives of everyone in his orbit.

Despite having donated his likeness to the character, Youssef knows that TV Ramy sucks. “You pick the worst side of you because then the people you meet are like, ‘Oh, you’re so much better than I expected!’ As opposed to the other way around,” he explains. “It’s all upside, really. You gotta undersell hard.”

Hadid can relate. “That’s what I’ve dealt with my whole career!” she adds. “People will meet me and think, Oh, I thought you were a bitch. Or I thought you were mean. [They assume] I’m this other person. I’m like, This other person that you saw on a magazine cover: no soul, no nothing? It’s just an armor.”

Full interview: gq.com

Categories News

Bella Hadid Joins ‘Ramy’ Season 3 in Recurring Role, Her First on a Scripted Series

Supermodel Bella Hadid has joined the cast of Hulu’s “Ramy” as a recurring guest star in Season 3. Details have not yet been revealed on Hadid’s character or her relationship to the show’s other characters just yet.

“Ramy” reps the first credited scripted role for Hadid. The news comes as production gets underway on the third season of “Ramy,” the Emmy-nominated Hulu comedy that has also earned a Golden Globe for star Ramy Youssef.

“Ramy” also stars Laith Nakli, Hiam Abbass, Amr Waked, May Calamawy, Dave Merheje, Mohammed Amer and Steve Way. As “Ramy” returns, it continues the story of first-generation Egyptian American Ramy Hassan (Youssef) and his family.

Per its logline, “Ramy” continues to “bring a new perspective to the screen as it explores the challenges of what it’s like to be caught between a religious community who believes life is a moral test, and a millennial generation that doubts an afterlife even exists. In the third season, his family is forced to confront having lived a life dedicated to worldly concerns — and in some cases, lies — while Ramy all but abandons his spiritual journey, instead dedicating himself to him and his uncle’s diamond business.”

“Ramy” is written, directed, executive produced and created by Youssef. Other executive producers include Adel Kamal, Christopher Storer, Tyson Bidner, Amir Sulaiman, Jerrod Carmichael, co-creators Ari Katcher and Ryan Welch as well as Kate Thulin. The series is produced by A24.

Hadid, currently seen on the April 2022 cover of Vogue, has also appeared on the covers of French, Italian, British, Japanese, Chinese and other international editions of that magazine as well, and has also been seen on the covers of V Magazine, POP, Harper’s Bazaar and others. Bella currently holds contracts with Dior Cosmetics and Michael Kors. Her campaigns have included Fendi, Versace, Givenchy, Moschino, Calvin Klein and Missoni. She’s also co-founder and partner (with CEO Jen Batchelor) of Kin Euphorics, an alcohol-free alternative and general wellness drink. She has more than 50 million Instagram followers.

Hadid is represented by WME, IMG and The Lede Company.

Source: variety.com